Sunday, October 26, 2014

More Candy Corns?

Yeah, I hear you... "..For someone who doesn't like the candy so much - you sure like creating things that are inspired by them."
My inspiration comes from those around me.. and people around me like Candycorns... I don't see the appeal :P


This was actually made last year for a newborn that a friend was welcoming into the family. This bootie/cap set is designed for a newborn (Cap's circumference is 16.5 inches, Booties length is 3.5 inches) To those who have a little one who is celebrating their first Halloween this year, this is the perfect seasonal project.  Enjoy :)



Materials:
Lily® Sugar N Cream Cotton in Sunshine, Hot Orange, and White
2 - 16mm Button
Size US F5/3.75mm Crochet Hook
Size US G6/4.00mm Crochet Hook
Gauge: 2x2in = 7 sts/4 Rows

For Cap:
with Size F Hook and White,
___ Rnd 1: Using either the [ch 2, begin work in 2nd st from hook] or [magic circle] method to begin project, 6 hdc in st, slst  in 1st st to join  (6 sts)
___ Rnd 2: ch-1, [hdc in nxt st, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (9 sts)
___ Rnd 3: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst in to join  (9 sts)
___ Rnd 4: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 2 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (12 sts)
___ Rnds 5-6: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join  (12 sts/ea rnd)
___ Rnd 7: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 3 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (15 sts)
___ Rnds 8-9: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join  (15 sts/ea rnd)
___ Rnd 10: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 4 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (18 sts)
___ Rnds 11-12: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join, changing to Hot Orange on lst st  (18 sts/ea rnd)

with Hot Orange,
___ Rnd 13: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 2 sts, hdc-Spike in nxt st] 6 times, slst to join  (18 sts)
___ Rnd 14: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 5 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (21 sts)
___ Rnd 15: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join  (21 sts)
___ Rnd 16: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 6 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (24 sts)
___ Rnd 17: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 7 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (27 sts)
___ Rnd 18: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 8 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (30 sts)
___ Rnd 19: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 9 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (33 sts)
___ Rnd 20: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 10 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (36 sts)
___ Rnd 21: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join, changing to Sunshine on lst st  (36 sts)

with Sunshine,
___ Rnd 22: ch-1, hdc in ea of nxt 2 sts, (hdc-Spike in nxt st, hdc in ea of nxt 5 sts) 5 times, hdc-Spike in nxt st, hdc in ea of nxt 3 sts, slst to join  (36 sts)
___ Rnd 23: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 11 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (39 sts)
___ Rnd 24: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 12 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (42 sts)
___ Rnd 25: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 13 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (45 sts)
___ Rnd 26: ch-1, [hdc in ea of nxt 14 sts, hdc-Inc in nxt st] 3 times, slst to join  (48 sts)
___ Rnds 27-30: ch-1, hdc in ea st around, slst to join  (48 sts/ea rnd)
___ Rnd 31: BpHdc in nxt st, FpHdc in nxt st around  (48 sts)
___ Rnds 32-24: BpHdc in around ea BpHdc, FpHdc around ea FpHdc around  (48 sts/ea rnd)
___ Rnd 25: change to Size G Hook - sc in ea st around  (48 sts)
___ Rnd 36: loosely slst in BLO of ea st around  (48 sts)
Finish Off.  Secure and weave in tail to hide.


For Booties:
with Size F Hook and Sunshine,
___ ROW 1: Chain 5, sc in 2nd chain from hook and in ea of nxt 3 chs, TURN  (4 sts) 
___ ROW 2: ch-1, sc in nxt st, Inc in ea of nxt 2 sts, sc in nxt st, TURN  (6 sts)
___ ROWS 3-5: ch-1, sc in ea st across, TURN  (6 sts/ea row)
___ ROW 6: ch-1, sc in nxt st, Inc in nxt st, sc in ea of nxt 2 sts, Inc in nxt st, sc in nxt st, TURN  (8 sts)
___ ROWS 7-10: ch-1, sc in ea st across, TURN  (8 sts)
___ ROW 11: ch-1, sc in nxt st, Dec nxt 2 sts tog, sc in ea of nxt 2 sts, Dec nxt 2 sts tog, sc in nxt st, TURN  (6 sts)
___ ROW 12: ch-1, sc in nxt st, (Dec nxt 2 sts tog) twice, sc in nxt st, TURN  (4 sts)

Begin working in ROUNDS for remainder of Bootie

___ RND 1: ch-1, sc in ea of nxt 3 sts, Inc in nxt st, working down side of Rows 1-11, sc in ea of nxt 10 sts, 3 sc in nxt st (mark 2nd st of 3 sc just made), working in sts of ROW 1, sc in ea of nxt 2 sts, 3 sc in nxt st, working up opposite side of rows, sc in ea of nxt 10 sts, sc in same st as first sc made this round, finish off with Sunshine, weave  in and hide tail  (34 sts)

with Hot Orange, 
___ Rnd 2:  join with sc at marked st on Rnd 1, sc in nxt st, Dec nxt 2 sts tog, sc in ea of nxt 8 sts, hdc in ea of nxt 16 sts, sc in ea of nxt 6 sts, join with slst  (33 sts)
___ Rnd 3: ch-1, sc in ea st around, join with slst  (33 sts)
___ Rnd 4: ch-1, sc in ea of nxt 11 sts, (hdc-Dec nxt 2 sts tog) 4 times, hdc in nxt st, (hdc-Dec nxt 2 sts tog) 4 times, sc in ea of nxt 4 sts, join with slst, changing to White   (25 sts)
___ Rnd 5: sc in ea st around  (25 sts)
___ Rnd 6: for Bootie 1: slst in ea of nxt 9 sts, ch-12, sc in 7th ch from hook, sc in ea of nxt 5 chs, slst in remaining sts around Rnd 5
                    for Bootie 2: slst in ea of nxt 23 sts, ch-12, sc in 7th ch from hook, sc in ea of nxt 5 chs, slst in remaining sts around Rnd 5
Finish off. Secure and weave in tail to hide.
Affix Buttons to Bootie.








(¯`·._(_.·´¯`·._.» Copyright «._.·´¯`·._)_.·´¯)

By utilizing any product from FiberDoodles by K4TT, whether by clicking over the internet, telephone, facsimile or otherwise, you agree to the Terms and Conditions of the FiberDoodles by K4TT End User Licensing Agreement or qualification.
Users may not redistribute, resell, and/or translate pattern into another language for reselling. Questions regarding sale of finished items is answered on this FiberDoodles by K4TT Blog, under the heading of EULA.
All patterns are released in good faith. Every effort has been made to ensure that all instructions are accurate and complete. FiberDoodles by K4TT cannot, however, be responsible for human error, typographical mistakes or variations in individual work. If you should find any errors that you feel need attention, please notify me.

All patterns released from FiberDoodles by K4TT are protected under Federal copyright laws. Reproduction/distribution, in part or in whole, is strictly prohibited unless specifically authorized. This includes, but is not limited to, any form of reproduction or distribution on or through the Internet, including posting, scanning, "Crochet-A-Longs" and/or eMail transmission. If you wish to share this pattern, please link to the website and/or page - DO NOT re-print or re-post to another website.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A Halloween Visitor

Every year around this time, spooks and goblins abound.  Children dress up in their Halloween bests in search of treats and a little fellow from another planet comes for a visit.  Mook-E!



Mook-E, after hearing about what a bounty of sweet goodies can be found on the planet Earth from a fellow space traveler, who visited some years ago and was fond of Reeses Pieces; makes the journey each year in search of chocolates, hard sweets and of course, bubble gum.  

It's the one night a year, he can waddle along the streets and not cause a ruckus with his odd appearance... although, if you ask him, it is the humans who are the odd ones.



Mook-E is always on the look-out for sweets to share and a friend to share them with.  This year, we were lucky enough to have him pose for a plushie likeness, so that he can stay around all year long - helping the little monsters in our world eat all the treats of Halloween.  Now you can have Mook-E you all year long too!



Mook-E the Monster is a 9 page Written Crochet Pattern with detail oriented photographs and clearly written directions to help you create your own little monster.  When crocheted with materials listed, Mook-E is an impressive 12.5" tall and his Goodie Bag can hold a king-sized candybar.



Mook-E is now available for purchase.  Pick up your pattern today and get hookin' tonight!


Purchase Mook-E the Monster on Etsy.com


** WARNING ** Young children, toddlers and infants should ALWAYS be supervised when playing with this toy. There may be small pieces that a child can dislodge and there is potential for ingestion or aspiration injuries. Check all toys periodically for breakage and potential hazards. Broken toys can develop small parts which may present the potential for ingestion or aspiration injuries. A toy that cannot be repaired should be thrown away immediately. Please remember to use a yarn which is safe, as young children are likely to put toy in their mouth.

Pattern:
 

Materials Used in Model:

Red Heart® WW 4-Ply Yarn in 3862 Jade, 0528 Med Purple, 0311 White, 0256 Carrot and 0312 Black
poly-fil fiberfill
Size US G6/4.25mm crochet hook
Crochet Needle for sewing
Long Straight Pins for positioning

This pattern is written in English, using US Crochet Terms.
Patterns are sent in PDF form as an attachment to the eMail address that you have on file with PayPal, within 24 hours of your payment. You will need an Adobe Reader, or like software to view written materials.  You can visit http://get.adobe.com/ to find out more about Adobe and it's products.

By ordering any product from FiberDoodles by K4TT, whether by clicking over the internet, telephone, facsimile or otherwise, you agree to the Terms and Conditions of the FiberDoodles by K4TT End User Licensing Agreement or qualification.
Purchasers may not redistribute, resell, and/or translate pattern into another language for reselling. Questions regarding sale of finished items is answered on this FiberDoodles by K4TT Blog, under the heading of EULA.
Please note that there may be certain orders that FiberDoodles by K4TT is unable to accept and must cancel. We reserve the right, at our sole discretion, to refuse or cancel any order for any reason. FiberDoodles by K4TT may also require additional verifications or information before accepting any order. You will be contacted if all or any portion of your order is canceled or if additional information is required to accept your order. If your order is canceled after your credit or debit card has been charged, we will issue a credit to your card in the amount of the charge.
Due to the format and ease in reproduction, patterns are non-refundable.
All patterns are sold in good faith. Every effort has been made to ensure that all instructions are accurate and complete. FiberDoodles by K4TT cannot, however, be responsible for human error, typographical mistakes or variations in individual work. If you should find any errors that you feel need attention, please notify me.

All patterns purchased from FiberDoodles by K4TT are protected under Federal copyright laws. Reproduction/distribution, in part or in whole, is strictly prohibited unless specifically authorized. This includes, but is not limited to, any form of reproduction or distribution on or through the Internet, including posting, scanning, "Crochet-A-Longs" and/or eMail transmission. Each pattern is encrypted with identification unique to each individual purchaser.




Saturday, October 18, 2014

Most Often Asked Question

The most often asked question I get is truly the most surprising to me.  And it doesn't matter how it's phrased, it's always the same..

"What do you use to..."


I guess I find it surprising because I had never thought it was any different than what everyone else is/was using. As if I had some sort of magical tool that made things work as intended each and every time.  Mostly, it's just whatever makes the process easier.
So I will show you my "Crochet Arsenal" and see how it compares with what you use.


1.  Hook(s):  Every crocheter has hooks, this is a given - but what hooks are in your arsenal?  

Mine range from size 14 (thread) to Size P (at least I think that is currently the biggest hook I have, although I rarely use it).  But comfort and weight are the most important factor in your hook - it should feel comfortable to YOU.  It doesn't matter what the designer uses, what your best friend uses... you need a hook that feels good in YOUR hand .. an extension of your hand.



About 2 years ago, I had a client ask me if I used ergonomic hooks... and at the time, I did not.  

I was using the standard ole' Boye hook that could be purchased at any chain store that also sold crafts. Heck, once or twice, I had even seen Boye (or was it Bates) hooks in a Dollar Store.
But,  I was happy, didn't feel I needed anything 'fancy'... my 'standard' hooks did their job!  Then a client sent me a Crochet Dude ergonomic hook because that is what she used and loved... and  boy oh boy how my opinion changed!!
Now, I hate working with standard hooks.. I love my soft-grips and bulkier handle :)   I won't go into all the 'reasons' behind ergonomic hooks - there are plenty of pros/cons and blogs about what is so great (or horrible) about them.




I currently use (almost exclusively) Tulip Etimo Crochet Hooks. 
In fact, I love my Tulips so much; I purchased an extra set for myself in addition to purchasing a set for my lead associate.
It's all about comfort and I found these to be the most comfortable hook I've ever held.

Some suggestions before anyone rushes out and purchases a set, since these hooks can be quite expensive (Tulips are about $8 a hook/Crochet Dude Hooks are about $3).
     - Start by purchasing only 1 hook in the size you use most often.  It may take a little bit to get used to the new feel of the hook in your hand, and let's face it, you may not like it.  It feels different, bulkier.. heavier and may even feel a little 'off balanced' at first.  (I found these issues were easy to overcome - but that's me!  It took me about 2 days to feel completely comfortable with the new sensation in my hand)
     - Borrow a friend's extra hook 
     - Use coupons.  Now almost every major chain craft store offers 'deals' and discounts either through mailings or clubs. And yes, Michael's, ACMoore, Joann's and even WalMart carry "ergonomic hooks" now.



2.  Earring Findings??:  Well, okay - this one might not be as usual, but it's purpose sure is.  How do I use them?  These little beauties make EXCELLENT stitch markers!    I know many people use a snippet of yarn or a safety pin and some even purchase plastic stitch markers and that is what I used to use... until I had put my work down to grab the phone (out of my reach) and someone (a four legged someone) had snagged a toe on the working yarn while attempting to follow me.. and before I knew it.. I had 4 rounds pulled out.
For me, personally, I couldn't live without my earring findings.  They are very thin, so they don't gap the stitches.  They clasp closed, so I don't have to worry about accidentally pulling something out and they also can be used to "hold a loop" so that when you want to finish up for the night, you don't have to worry about your last few stitches going missing due to someone 'moving' your work!



3.  Knitting Needles:  Katt's got her crafts mixed up!  Knitting Needles are for KNITTING! what could they possibly have to do with Crochet?  Well, originally, I purchased knitting needles for, well, teaching myself how to knit... sadly there's just never been the time (or patience on my end).  
But one evening while working on a scuptgurumi, I could not locate a dowel to use for my neck - but there were these thin knitting needles sitting there.. so what could it hurt?
These long needles hold Amigurumi heads on very well!  Inserting the needle from butt (seated point) and out through neck and then into head or your doll can allow for optimal placement, posture and tilt!   This gives your creation it's own personality each and every time, before making that final commitment with needle and thread/yarn.  (They also work real good for leg placement(s).)  
** If you like this idea, remember to purchase very THIN needles as they WILL spread stitches.



4.  Quilting Pins/Long Pins:  I cannot live without my pins.  To me, they are nearly as valuable a crocheting item as the hook or yarn(s) I have at my disposal.
Well, you "design", I only follow instructions!  Of course you NEED pins as part of the designing - so you can tell me where to put things.
What most clients don't give themselves enough credit for is the art that they, themselves are also making!  I merely provide the 'recipe', it is YOU who provide the love and the "ingredients"... that is why handmade is always unique.
Your tension, flare, color choices... even how lightly or full you stuff your work can vastly change the 'look' of a project.  


Sometimes clients get a bit frustrated because I do not include in the instructions for the EXACT placements for items.  I tend to be more general. 

                "Between Rnds 9 &15 centered on Head" .. etc..  and this is intentional.  

Sure, I could write, top of eye should hit Rnd xx, bottom of eye to hit Rnd xx .... 12 sts out from center of Head.

But making art isn't an exact science.  What if you didn't use Red Heart Yarn?  What if you had to use a thinner yarn as many of my overseas clients are forced to do...  or if you do not stuff your head as firmly as I do?  What if you cannot maintain your tension throughout a project or cannot use the size hook that is listed in the materials?  (Not everyone can crochet with an F Hook or even a G.)
While in theory the placement(s) should still work ...  theory doesn't always match up with what actually happens.  


AESTHETICALLY.. (that is a viewer's perception), your project could be vastly to slightly different, due to the individuality of a client's work or even personal preference.  
In addition, feature placements can change a 'personality'.   It is in my own humble opinion, that how exactly to arrange a project's features should be a "personal one" based on general "rules" - eyes belong on head above the nose, ears belong either at the top or along the side and noses fall center of the face under the eyes.... but then again, you see something like this..


© 2008 Sue PendletonSakura, A Little Japanese Bear
and he is ADORABLE!  Yet very unconventional!
Pins allow you to position and re-position before 'finalizing' your project.  You would be surprised at just how many looks can be made using the same features!
Do not under-estimate the artistic role YOU take in creating a project from FDbyK4TT pattern.



5.  General Purpose Tweezers:  I remember a few years ago watching as a designer marketed this plastic "stuffing tool" and I thought to myself.. OMG Really?!  Why on Earth would anyone need that?  I was surprised by how many people actually were interested in the little gadget.  Color me perplexed!

This item would be 1 of 2 items that I wouldn't be surprised to hear wasn't in a the casual crocheter's arsenal - but for any die-hard amigurumi hooker, it's a MUST HAVE!  Not only does a pair of tweezers help with stuffing - but also for those little tails that eventually will have to be hidden!
I also like to remove individual strands of stray fil with my tweezers, as sometimes these little strays aren't just laying on the project, but are weaved into the stitches or poking out a stitch.




7.  Yarn/Embroidery & Upholstery Needle(s):  I am probably the world's 2nd worst seamstress.  I say 2nd, because I am sure that there is someone out there that is worse than I am... perhaps a toddler or someone that may have to use fabricated materials (like a sturdy twig with an 'eye') to secure one thing to another... but I am really BAD.  
Because of this, I look for the simplest tools to help make the most challenging aspect of my work as easy as possible (and help it to look professional as possible).

In addition to needles like those photographed above, I also have several long needles which range from 6 inches in length to one that is 10 inches in length.  I use these very seldom, but they can be very useful when attaching limbs to a body of a doll!  (Example would be Pulp the Pumpkin)



8, 9 & 10  Yarn, Scissors & Fil: Obviously, in addition to hooks, the crocheter will need some form of working material.  Whether it is worsted weight yarn, baby yarn, sports yarn.. the list goes on and on.  Eventually, you will find a medium that you work best with.  
For amigurumi, I can't stress enough how good Red Heart's Acrylic Worsted Weight yarn is.  Unlike clothing items, like hats and afghans (for which I use cotton most of the time), toys need to be a little 'stiffer' to help hold their shape.  RH yarns I have found to be the best!

Scissors - You must have a sharp cutting instrument at your side at all times!  Dull cutting tools will only cause you more headaches in the long-run!  Let's face it, yarn is not always perfect - pulls, clumps and snags can show up anywhere in a skein of yarn; most often when you've got a good rhythm going.    Having your cutting tools with you makes quick work of little annoyances and get's you back to crocheting quickly!  The Clover Pendant (like in the photo above) was given to me a few years ago as a gift by an associate... and it's around my neck at all times :)

edit: oops!  I originally forgot to write in the fil.  I use a variety of fil - but the one I use most often, is Fairfield Polyfil.  It's inexpensive and it does not clump or get all yucky when I am filling it in my projects -  since I am a heavy stuffer, this is majorly important.


I hope that for the casual crocheter, this post helps you create projects that you find more rewarding and less 'stressful' to complete.   
Having the proper tools by your side, can truly make all the difference in your creations.
If this posts inspires you to create more handmade treats for your family and friends, then I have accomplished my mission.  
If you have suggestions that you wouldn't mind passing on, I'd be happy to share them as well.  Sharing great tips is how we all benefit.

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Oh What a Beautiful Sight..



Have you ever seen such a beautiful sight in your life??
Well, okay, yeah... there's family - the birth of a child.. the first bloom of Spring, the sweet face of a baby animal...  I get it...
but as a designer, this sight ranks right up there.. it's definitely (well, probably) in the Top 10....20... 50 - definitely Top 100.

Yeah, well this time I was especially excited to see the "Oop's Truck" (as the people used to call it),  since I ran out of Polyfil and wouldn't be able to get to the store until the weekend (and it's not like it's entirely my fault, half of my studio is still packed away in boxes) 
... and of course, I was awaiting some new yarn colors.  I do get really excited about 'new' colors... is that weird?



Yarn deliveries always make me smile!  The Hub keeps telling me he is going to buy stock in Red Heart and Bernat, at the rate I use them up :)  He also said this Halloween he was going to charge the neighborhood kids admission to "FiberDoodle's Laboratory of Pain" - where heads, bodies and severed limbs can be found among the bookshelves, stands, baskets, chairs and workstation ... yeah.. he's funny... not-so-much!

In all seriousness, I don’t know how other crochet designers do it, but sometimes, I have to take something apart many times before I finally achieve the look I am aiming for - I don't think too many "designers" create a flawless design on the first try every time they pick up their hook - I may be wrong, but that level of perfection is akin to "Crochet God"
I, however, will try something one way for a few hours, decide I don't like it, unravel it, try it again, unravel it again - walk away, pout, tantrum, calm down and then start all over again.   
and then, sometimes, I just chuck it in the waste bin and start over from scratch a year or two later...

Many times, what looks so mind-blowingly perfect, in the moment; doesn't live up to my visual standards 24 hours later. (24 hours is my personal 'aesthetic test' - I set completed projects aside and out of sight for 24 hours, if I still am pleased with the result after that; off it goes to an associate for testing!)
While the end result (hopefully) appears streamlined and simple for you, the crocheter; you’ll never really hear about just how many hours went into deciding how big or small to make a feature, what features were needed or even what shape the project should be; or just how much yarn is chewed up and spat back out,for something that will take you less than 7oz of any one color and only a few hours to make.



Yup, sometimes, after working on a new pattern/project for 2 or 3 days, I still end up with a pile of unraveled yarn, and a nothing to show for it.. except an ever growing pile of unraveled yarn.

So how much yarn do you think I go through in a typical month? 

Well, on a good month, I purchase between 8-16 skeins of yarn a weekend (shh don't tell the hub!)  That doesn't mean I use all those skeins.. but sometimes you really just can't walk away from a good 'deal' on clearance yarns or that 'new color' sitting there, just released, in all it's .. ohh-what-can-I-make-with-that? glory...  ... or 1 of 700 different other reasons.  :)

I am a very visual person... and about 2 years ago, I began saving the yarn wrappers from my yearly yarn usage from January until December (this helps with inventory for the year.)

So, so far this year?
hmm..

Ohh!! Did you hear that??  That was my knitting friends, letting out their anguished cries of scratchy pain, just seeing all those Red Heart labels!  *grin*

I placed a Boye size H crochet hook in the middle of the second photo taken, so you can gain a truer perspective on the mass of labels that I have used since January of this year on "designing"... and that is with 3 months of Summer vaycay..  
for those 'counting' there's over 230 skein wrappers there.. and that is not counting my 'other brand usage'.. hee hee..

Told you I have a "supportive man in my life".  But, yeah, I am beginning to think he should buy stock too!




Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Hello Fall! Time to Get Back to Work!


It's Fall and I have to admit, I truly love this weather.
Perhaps it is due more to coming off a hot summer.  The cool air of fall somehow seems to forgive the lazy days of summer and generates a feeling of crisp rejuvenated exhilaration.. 
... or perhaps, it's simply because it means that SNOW and the holidays will soon be here..
Either way, as my associate recently remarked, I often go on 'creative overload' during the fall months!  And that has certainly happened again this year.

As many already know, I began taking the summers off about 2 years ago.  The heat and the humidity of working with yarn is often annoying enough - but to try and design in those conditions are completely frustrating!  

So I get the bulk of my charity works done during July & August - which gives me more freedoms (theoretically) to design during the fall and winter months, when it's cool.
The hopes for this year are to release a new pattern (at least) every Tuesday during the months of October and November.  
Well, at least that is the hopes currently.

Recently released (Tuesday, 30 Sep 2014)  the ADD-ON pattern for Baby's First Plushie - Teddy



This quick little add-on will transform an already adorable bear into your child's favorite storybook character.  This is not a stand alone pattern.  You need to have the Baby's First Plushie - Teddy in your collection before being able to benefit from this add-on.

Purchase Baby's First Plushie - Teddy and the Baby's First Plushie - Storytime Tribute on Etsy.com

Also, as September drew to a close, FiberDoodles by K4TT, (as some many have already discovered) relaunched it's Facebook page! 
It is the hopes that by using Facebook, rather than blog or forum, I will be able to interact with you more quickly and get to know my clients on a more personal level.  
If you have a Facebook account, stop by and 'like' the FiberDoodles by K4TT page.